The Ann Richards School for Young Women Leaders

Alumni day 2018: Question & Answer with Graduates

in ARS News/News/Showcase by

Rosalinda Casso-O’hara

Class of 2013

Q: How would you define life after Ann Richards?

A: Well, by the time we graduated I was like, ‘I’m tired and I don’t know what I’m doing next.’ But college is so much easier than Ann Richards. By the time I had left ARS I had already done Capstone, and I ended up actually doing a capstone in college, and it was much easier. It was easy to get into the flow of being at school still and doing my work, and being present.

Q: What advice would you give to current ARS students to prepare for college?

A: Scholarships are really great, I got the PTSA scholarship from here, and that went through all of my college career. I could at least count on some of [college] being paid in some way or form. Usually I ended up using [the scholarship] for books, but that really did help because that would come out of pocket otherwise

Q: What was your biggest learning curve transitioning into college?

A: To figure out how weird guys are. When I went up [to Colorado State in Fort Collins], we had a lot of snow. At first I really didn’t think about it, I said, ‘Okay, I’m going to wear my boots, my jacket, and my coat.’ Then I saw guys–only guys–wearing shorts and flip flops in 3 inches of snow. As a side note, adapting to the cold was awful. I never want to do it again! It was too cold.

 

Erin Lungwitz

Class of 2016

Q: How would you define life after Ann Richards?

A: It’s different. You are in a completely new place, new people, new settings . . . so super different. Life after Ann Richards is good, and this school helped prepare me well, it’s just totally different. Lots of new experiences, new environments, and new challenges.

Q: What advice would you give to current ARS students to prepare for college?

A: Just know that getting to a new place and establishing meaningful friendships takes time. Know that when you get there, it’s okay, some people might look like they have it together and they’re already in a friend group, but everyone’s in the same boat. It takes time. You’re not just going to get somewhere and immediately be like, ‘Okay here are my new people and I have it all set up,’ but it will fall into place.

Q: What was your biggest learning curve transitioning into college?

A: I think the social curve was the hardest. When you grow up with people for 7 years you have really strong relationships. It’s easy to make friends [in college], but it’s definitely a different kind of friendships and it takes time to build really strong friendships. I think just starting almost completely over in a new place was the hardest thing, but it’s definitely doable.

General Advice: I thought in college, just because you had an hour and a half class a day and then you had nothing else going on, that I could just be lounging, watching Parks and Recreation everyday. No, your time will fill. You will have commitments. Your time will be packed. I was not expecting everyday to be so packed. Self-structuring your time is super important, and you should always be working on something.

 

Faith Vanderburt

Class of 2016

Q: What was your biggest learning curve transitioning into college?

A: Learning to be with people and do school at the same time, instead of having my school life and then having my social life. Having it be like the same thing and the same people was hard. Sometimes it’s just like, ‘You’re my friend that I see in class, but we’re not friends outside of class.’

Q: How would you define life after Ann Richards?

A: You have to study outside of class. It’s not like [high school] where I’m still in school, and I can study in a class where I’m not really doing anything. In college I don’t have class everyday, so I have to put myself somewhere where I can be productive.

Q: What advice would you give to current ARS students to prepare for college?

A: You might not think you have anything to work on, but you do. And if you’re not working on something specific, study. In high school it’s more like, ‘This is due next time I see you.’ In college it’s more, ‘This is due next week,’ and you might not have that professor again until after the assignment is due, so stay on top of your assignments.

Alejandra, also known as Ally Wait, is the sports, satire, and our voices editor of the Polaris Press. You will often find her badly budgeting, procrastinating, playing soccer, and making other people laugh. She laughs for about 8-9 hours a week and prefers eating with spoons and bowls. Spoons and bowls are the way to win this friendly senior’s heart.

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